Podcasts

Donald Trump: How to win kitsch and influence people
Political Theater, Episode 111

First lady Melania Trump awards Rush Limbaugh the Presidential Medal of Freedom during President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address in the House chamber on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s State of the Union was a master class in deploying conservative rhetoric, entertainment kitsch and Americana tropes before a televised audience.

Critics of the president frequently fail to understand his appeal to his supporters, but many times that comes down to the somewhat elusive question of taste. It might just depend on whether you prefer “Game of Thrones” or “The Big Bang Theory.”

Unchecked power
CQ on Congress, Ep. 184

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, talks with reporters in the Senate subway before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Wall Street czar Linda Lacewell takes on regulation
Fintech Beat, Ep. 38

Linda Lacewell, superintendent of the New York State Department of Financial Services (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

When it comes to regulating Wall Street, perhaps no one person is more important than Linda Lacewell, the superintendent of New York’s Department of Financial Services. On her one year anniversary in office, she talks with Fintech Beat about changes to the BitLicense, the Apple Pay card and her 2020 priorities.

Infrastructure week is back again
CQ Budget, ep. 142

UNITED STATES - JANUARY 23: Storm clouds pass over the dome of the U.S. Capitol building on Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate says no to witnesses, as final vote is set for Wednesday
CQ on Congress, Ep 183

A staffer carries multiple binders through the Senate Reception Room before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate rejected, 49-51, a bid by Democrats on Jan. 31 to call witnesses in President Trump's impeachment trial and will now move to closing arguments and votes on Feb. 5 on the two articles of impeachment, accusing Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. CQ Roll Call White House reporter Niels Lesniewski explains why Republicans objected to witnesses and why they will vote to acquit.

Wildest Iowa caucus ever?
Political Theater, Episode 110

The Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses could see record turnout and a wild finish for delegates. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Just a few days to go, and it’s anyone’s guess who will win the Iowa caucuses. What’s the biggest thing on Iowans’ minds as they decide among a jumbled contest among the Democrats? Impeachment? Electability? Personal likability?

The last time we spoke with caucus expert and political scientist David Redlawsk, he was just starting a six-monthlong sabbatical in Iowa. Amid the electoral hubbub of the Iowa State Fair in August, Redlawsk said Iowans were just not sure what to do with all these candidates, as more than 20 Democrats, and even some Republicans, made their cases in the Hawkeye State. 

Bitcoin Intermediaries
Fintech Beat, ep. 37

LONDON, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 24: A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin on October 24, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

The most wonderful time of the year: budget forecast release week
CQ Budget, ep. 141

UNITED STATES - AUGUST 11: Scaffolding has been removed from the upper section of the U.S. Capitol dome as the Architect of the Capitol works to complete the Capitol Dome Restoration Project before the 2017 presidential inauguration. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Comic Maz Jobrani is seriously funny about politics
Political Theater, Episode 109

Comedian and actor Maz Jobrani has thoughts about Washington, performance in the Trump era and hanging out in the fake West Wing. (Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images)

What a time to be heckled by Trump supporters when you’re an Iranian American comedian!

Ph.D. dropout and comic Maz Jobrani takes Heard on the Hill’s Kathryn Lyons “back to school” to talk Trump hecklers, his least favorite 2020 candidate and what it’s like to be in the fake West Wing in the latest Political Theater podcast

What's in an impeachment trial?
CQ on Congress, ep 183

House impeachment managers Reps. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., left, and Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., are seen in the Capitol before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Thursday, January 23, 2020. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Life in the ‘Hakuna Matata’ White House
Political Theater, Episode 108

What’s it like covering President Donald Trump? Let us count the ways.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

There is a lot to learn from covering the White House for four years. For former CQ Roll Call White House correspondent John T. Bennett, that included realizing aides for President Donald Trump were looking into that “Hakuna Matata” thing; whether the president’s accessibility is a double-edged sword; and how to stay sane in a crazy environment.

Now as Bennett takes on a new assignment as bureau chief with The Independent of London, he shares some of the biggest lessons he got from life in the Executive Mansion in the latest Political Theater podcast.

Congress faces narrow spending increase as VA health care costs balloon
CQ Budget, Ep. 140

UNITED STATES - AUGUST 15: The U.S. flag waves in front of the U.S. Capitol dome on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Iran, North Korea and Crypto
Fintech Beat, Ep. 36

Looking toward the North Korean side of the Joint Security Area within the DMZ from Panmunjom, South Korea. (Photo By Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

Fintech Beat gives an inside view from former intelligence officials on how sanctions and political gyrations between the Trump administration and Iran and North Korea can impact financial technology, and how these regimes can use cryptocurrencies in nefarious ways.

Historic impeachment trial begins. Now what?
CQ on Congress, Ep. 182

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., Democratic Caucus Chair Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., and Rep. Sylvia R. Garcia, D-Texas, walk through the Capitol Rotunda as they pass from the House to the Senate on Thursday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Impeachment clouds hang over home stretch of Iowa caucuses
Political Theater, Episode 107

Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders speak as Tom Steyer looks on after the Democratic presidential debate Tuesday in Des Moines, Iowa. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

This week’s Democratic presidential debate in Iowa was the last chance for the significantly winnowed field to make a big impression — not just before the Feb. 3 caucuses there but also before the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump begins. 

Of the six Democrats onstage Tuesday night at Drake University in Des Moines, three of them — Sens. Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar — will be jurors in the upcoming trial and not free to move about the country, as the old Southwest Airlines ads went.