President Donald Trump

Watch: Suspicious substance investigated outside Schiff’s office

A Capitol Police officer walks by the Rayburn office of Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., after a suspicious substance was reported on Thursday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Pelosi defends ripping Trump’s speech as message to American people about SOTU falsehoods
‘I don’t need any lessons from anybody, especially the president of the United States, about dignity,’ speaker says

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., conducts her weekly news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on Thursday, February 6, 2020. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday defended her decision to rip up President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech, saying she decided about a quarter or third of the way through the address that something had to be done to indicate to the American people that his words were not the truth.

“I tore up a manifesto of mistruths,” the California Democrat said at her weekly news conference, noting the falsehoods in Trump’s speech on Tuesday evening were “dangerous to the American people if they believe what he said.”

Watch: Romney to vote to convict Trump
The Utah Republican is the first to break ranks

Sen. Mitt Romney talks with reporters in the Senate subway on January 28, 2020. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In an emotional floor speech, Utah Republican Sen. Mitt Romney said he would break with his party and vote to convict Trump. The vote makes him the first person in U.S. history to vote to convict a member of his own party in an impeachment trial of a president.

Strong, hateful and inspiring? — Lawmakers react to State of the Union in 3 words
#SOTUin3Words

President Donald Trump arrives in the House chamber to deliver his State of the Union address on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

How much does impeachment cost?

A staffer carries multiple binders as he walks through the Senate Reception Room before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Four months — that’s how long Congress has been busy impeaching and trying President Donald Trump, and it all costs money.

The process of investigating and impeaching can rack up a tab but exactly how much and how does such a lengthy process get paid for? Watch as CQ Roll Call examines where Congress finds the dough when a president’s actions are called into question and whether or not you’ll be picking up the tab. 

Impeachment trial endgame: Republicans hope for Friday vote to acquit Trump
Vote on considering witnesses, documents expected to fail, allowing McConnell to prevent further delays

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, arrives for the continuation of the Senate Impeachment Trial of President Donald Trump on Thursday. Collins is expected to vote with Democrats to consider witnesses but that vote may fail, leading to the trial ending Friday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate impeachment trial could end Friday if Republican confidence translates to them blocking a motion to consider witnesses and they are then able to move to a final vote to acquit President Donald Trump.

A few senators on the fence about witnesses have yet to make their intentions clear, so there is still room for a surprise turn of events. But several Republicans and Democrats seem to think a vote to consider witnesses will fail and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will move immediately to votes on the two articles of impeachment.

‘We gotta go, the trial started at 1 o’clock!’ — Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Jan. 20, 2020

Capitol workers wind the Ohio Clock in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Managing impeachment: Sensenbrenner’s seen it before
Wisconsin Republican was an impeachment manager in Clinton trial

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner R-Wis., and Bill McCollum, R-Fla., talk with reporters near Statuary Hall at the end of the first full day of the 1999 impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The opening arguments for President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial took 2½ days. Rep. Henry Hyde needed his opening arguments to be shorter in President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial.

Pens, Parnas and pain of imprisonment: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Jan. 13, 2020

Speaker Nancy Pelosi signs the articles of impeachment during an engrossment ceremony before taking them over to the Senate on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Pelosi signs articles of impeachment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi gets up after signing the articles of impeachment during an engrossment ceremony Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)