Intelligence

Lindsey Graham wants attorney general to testify on Mueller report

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., holds a press conference in the Capitol to discuss the Mueller report on Monday, March 25, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham plans to call Attorney General William Barr to testify in a public hearing about the Russia investigation and his conclusions that President Donald Trump did not obstruct justice.

“I’m asking him to lay it all out,” the South Carolina Republican said Monday at a press conference at the Capitol. But he stopped short of saying Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be asked to testify as well.

Democratic committee chairmen shift focus to Barr as House investigations forge ahead
House Democratic leaders want to examine what led attorney general to his conclusions

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler made it clear that Attorney General William Barr’s four-page summary of the Mueller report doesn’t answer a number of questions into the investigation into possible obstruction of justice. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The key Democratic-controlled House committees investigating President Donald Trump and his administration are forging ahead with their probes into the president, his finances, and allegations of nepotism despite special counsel Robert S. Mueller’s conclusion publicized Sunday that he could not “establish” a case that that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections.

But while House Democrats continue with their investigative work, they made clear Sunday that Attorney General William Barr’s four-page summary of Mueller’s key findings does not quell their appetite for information about Mueller’s 22-month probe.

White House says Democrats and Mueller tried to ‘overthrow’ Trump
White House spokeswoman warns that Democrats should ‘be careful’ about continuing investigations

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the media and Democrats have accused the president of being an agent of a foreign government, which she said amounts to treason. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 9:55 a.m. | The White House lashed out at Democrats and Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III, accusing them of trying to “overthrow” President Donald Trump.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called Mueller being unable to establish Trump 2016 campaign coordination with Russians “a great reminder also of the rule of law … but it’s also a sad reminder of the lack of accountability that started to seep into the media and into Democrats that have gone out for the last two years actually over two years and accused the president the United States of being an agent of a foreign government.

Some Republicans want an apology over Mueller investigation
Republicans celebrating a win, some calling for apologies, but members from both parties still want to see the full report

Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III “did not establish” collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and Russia but left the question of whether the president obstructed justice up to Attorney General William Barr. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional Republicans claimed victory Sunday that a letter from Attorney General William Barr summarizing the special counsel investigation ended the debate about whether Donald Trump’s campaign knowingly colluded with the Russian government.

But Democrats said the letter did not adequately allay their concerns about whether the president is guilty of obstruction of justice, and demanded that the attorney general hand over the full Mueller report and its underlying documents.

Congress set aside $1 billion after Parkland. Now schools are starting to use it
From panic buttons to metal detectors, communities take a page from Fort Knox

Communities around the country are beginning to spend the money that Congress designated for school safety in the wake of mass shootings last year. Above, the March for Our Lives drew young people to downtown D.C. in March 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Amid the rolling farmland of southwest Iowa sits the 7,800-population town of Creston, where the school district boasts of a “state-of-the-art school safety and security system” with a command center to monitor nearly 200 cameras, or roughly one for every seven students.

But the school superintendent isn’t done yet, thanks to a $500,000 grant from a program Congress stuffed into an omnibus spending bill a year ago. He plans to buy mobile metal detectors that could also be set up at football games, a shooter alert system that can sense when a gun goes off in one of the three schools and notify police, a “panic button” system and a new entry system.

Robert Mueller submits Russia report to Justice Department
Report’s delivery sets up showdown over how much public will see of it

Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III on Friday delivered his report on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible connections between the Russians and the Donald Trump campaign to Attorney General Robert Barr on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III on Friday submitted to the Justice Department the long-awaited final report on his nearly two-year investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible links between Russia and the Trump campaign.

No more indictments are expected in the investigation, a senior DOJ official told reporters. 

So you want to be on ‘Jeopardy!’? The online test draws nigh
If you’re a political wonk, you can follow in the footsteps of four congressional staffers

Isaac Loeb, a legislative aide of Vermont Democrat Rep. Peter Welch, playing Jeopardy. (Courtesy Isaac Loeb)

Alex Trebek may have pancreatic cancer, but the game show must go on. The longtime host, who announced his diagnosis earlier this month, is still taping new episodes of “Jeopardy!” — and the show is still hunting for new contestants.

Mark your calendars, because the official “Jeopardy!” online test opens in less than a week. The exam is your ticket to an in-person audition, provided you can nail 50 questions, each from a different category. 

Suspect who mailed explosive devices to Trump critics pleads guilty, avoids trial
None of the devices exploded before being discovered

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., was among the critics of President Donald Trump who were mailed explosive devices. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Florida man charged with mailing explosive devices to critics of President Donald Trump pleaded guilty Thursday before a federal judge in New York.

Cesar Sayoc Jr. was scheduled to go on trial this summer on charges including interstate transport of explosive devices, illegal mailing of explosives, threatening former presidents and assaulting federal officers. Sayoc was facing up to 58 years in prison.

Hackers eye the factory floor
Manufacturers are turning to internet-connected devices. That’s bringing new risks

Manufacturers of consumer goods, including car makers and those that make dishwashers, refrigerators and washing machines, are adopting internet-connected devices on shop floors.(Bill Pugliano/Getty Images file photo)

Factories across the world are increasingly switching to internet-connected sensors, monitors and other devices to operate and supervise their manufacturing operations more intensely. But the proliferation of such equipment is posing new cybersecurity risks.

Shop floor devices such as programmable logic controllers, remote terminal units and human-machine interface equipment have been in use for nearly half a century, said Sean Peasley, a partner at Deloitte who specializes in internet of things and cybersecurity.

Banks seek Congress’ help to block fintech path to ‘industrial’ charters
Industry group expects efforts to have bipartisan support on Hill

A bank industry group accuses financial technology firms like payment processor Square Inc. of trying to exploit a banking law loophole. (Courtesy Shutterstock)

A bank industry group is lobbying Congress to block financial technology firms, such as online lender Social Finance Inc. and payment processor Square Inc., from obtaining an obscure form of a state bank charter that would let them operate nationally with little federal supervision.

The Independent Community Bankers of America last week distributed a policy paper around Washington calling for an immediate moratorium on providing federal deposit insurance to industrial loan companies, or ILCs, which are chartered by only a few states — most notably Utah.