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Rep. Steve King blames ‘unhinged left’ in new fundraising email
Amid backlash over racist comments, the Iowa Republican asked supporters for donations

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, sent a fundraising email to supporters this week in which he claims the recent controversy can be attributed to the “unhinged left.” (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Despite growing calls for Steve King to resign after making racist comments, the Iowa Republican sent an email Thursday urging supporters for new donations. 

“The unhinged left has teamed up with Republican ‘NeverTrumpers’ and is pulling out all the stops to destroy me,” King said in the email, the Des Moines Register reported.

Louie Gohmert comes to Steve King’s defense
Texas congressman says rebuked Iowa congressman raised a ‘fair question’

Texas Republican Rep. Louie Gohmert, left, said Republican House leader Kevin McCarthy didn’t give Iowa GOP Rep. Steve King, right, “due process” before taking action against him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

GOP Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas defended his friend and colleague Rep. Steve King on Wednesday, suggesting that King’s comments to The New York Times about “white supremacy,” “white nationalism” and “Western civilization” were misconstrued by the media and lawmakers from both parties.

Republican leaders in the House decided earlier in the week to bar King from serving on any House committees, but the House voted Wednesday to refer a censure resolution to the House Ethics Committee instead of censuring him directly.

Steve King’s constituents in Iowa grapple with his ‘white supremacy’ comments
Some think Washington lawmakers are ‘overreacting,’ while others have said the Iowa Republican should resign

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, is under pressure from constituents in the 4th District for comments he made questioning when “white supremacy” became an offensive term. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Top Republicans in Washington — including Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell and Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 House Republican — have called for Rep. Steve King to resign from office over his comments about white supremacy and white nationalism to The New York Times last week.

 

How the House rebuke of Steve King would work
Whether reprimand or censure, a formal ding from the chamber comes with few consequences

Democrats Bobby Rush and Tim Ryan have introduced separate measures to censure Iowa Republican Steve King over a pattern of racist comments. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democratic leaders are planning to hold a vote Tuesday on a resolution of disapproval against Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King for racist comments, while two rank-and-file members are pushing for a stronger rebuke.

Democratic Reps. Bobby L. Rush of Illinois and Tim Ryan of Ohio introduced separate measures on Monday to censure King, setting into motion votes on one of Congress’ formal means of punishing members.

‘No slamming’ —Trump denies Schumer’s account of contentious White House meeting
President attacks Dems, media before heading to U.S.-Mexico border

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence arrive to the Capitol to attend the Senate Republican policy luncheon on Wednesday. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A contentious White House meeting spilled into a new day Thursday, with President Donald denying Democrats’ contention he slammed a situation room table and stormed out of a meeting about ending a partial government shutdown now in its 20th day.

“The president stomped out of the meeting,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California told reporters at the Capitol Wednesday afternoon. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York called Trump’s move a “temper tantrum,” contending while standing outside the West Wing that the president at one point “slammed the table” before calling the meeting “a waste of his time.”

Trump cuts off federal funds to California to fight ‘Forrest fires’
‘Unless they get their act together, which is unlikely,’ president tweets

President Donald Trump escalated his feud with California state leaders on Wednesday, tweeting he has cut off FEMA funds to the state over his view it mismanages the money in fighting forest fires. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said he has ordered FEMA to withhold funds from California’s state government until officials there “get their act together” fighting forest fires. But he tweeted he thinks that is “unlikely.”

The president long has criticized California state officials, sometimes with dubious claims, over wildfires there and their steps to prevent and nix them. But stopping the flow of federal funds is an escalation of the feud, and one that might raise the ire of lawmakers — even the sizable House GOP delegation from the Golden State.

Presidential contradictions: 3 takeaways from Trump’s Friday fracas
Government shutdown could last ‘years’ or end ‘a lot sooner,’ president says

President Donald Trump speaks during a hastily arranged news conference Friday in the White House Rose Garden. He is flanked by (left-right) Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, Vice President Mike Pence, House Minority Whip Steve Scalise and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | President Donald Trump emerged from the Oval Office on Friday afternoon after what congressional Democratic leaders described as a “contentious” meeting, flanked by Republican immigration hard-liners. What followed was more than an hour of presidential threats and backpedaling during an impromptu Rose Garden press conference.

At one point, the president confirmed something Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., told reporters just minutes earlier: That during the closed-door Situation Room session he threatened to keep a quarter of the federal government closed for “months or even years” unless he gets $5.6 billion for his proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Trump, Democrats remain ‘far apart’ on shutdown deal as talks resume
Schumer compares president to ‘Jell-O.’ Sanders questions Pelosi before Friday meeting

President Donald Trump, joined by Vice President Mike Pence, meets with Republican and Democratic congressional leadership on Wednesday in the Situation Room at the White House. They will meet again Friday to try to make progress on ending a partial government shutdown. (Shealah Craighead/White House)

President Donald Trump and congressional leaders, including top Democrats that oppose his proposed southern border wall, will try again Friday to make progress on ending a partial government shutdown. But the odds of a breakthrough appear small.

“Without a wall, you cannot have border security. Without a very strong form of barrier — call it what you will — but without a wall, you cannot have border security,” Trump said Thursday during a surprise visit to the White House briefing room, his first formal appearance there.

Trailblazers and absences define start of new Congress
Plenty of firsts, as well as some notable empty seats

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is sworn in Thursday, surrounded by children in the rostrum of the House chamber on the first day of the 116th Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first day of a new Congress is filled with ceremony and tradition, but there were a few things that set the start of the 116th Congress apart.

For the first time in history, a new congressional session began in the midst of a partial government shutdown. The swearing-in ceremonies and celebrations were clouded by the ongoing shutdown that’s now entered a second week. About a quarter of federal discretionary spending has run out, resulting in the shuttering of agencies and federal programs. But with the legislative branch already funded, there weren’t logistical problems on Capitol Hill that would devastate a high-profile day like the opening of a new Congress.

Moments from opening day of the 116th Congress
Pelosi gets speaker’s gavel, kids dab and floss, and Delgado frames the words they threw at him

Incoming Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez takes a selfie with, from second left, Reps. Barbara Lee, Anne McLane Kuster and Jan Schakowsky. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The 116th Congress opened today with new members being sworn in and Democratic Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California reclaiming the speaker’s gavel eight years after she lost it when Republicans took control of the House.

Despite friction from the standoff over funding President Donald Trump’s border wall that led to a partial government shutdown, now in its 13th day, new members crossed the aisle to be greeted by old ones and celebrate with other freshmen.