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Mick Mulvaney, from Washington reformer to chief of graft
No matter what he says, don’t get over it, America

Mick Mulvaney is now at the center of an international corruption scandal he not only tolerated, but may have championed, Murphy writes. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

OPINION — In 2008, days after political newcomer Mick Mulvaney won a seat in the South Carolina state Senate, he told a local newspaper that many voters had suggested that he run for the U.S. House seat held by Democrat John Spratt instead. “I couldn’t stop laughing,” Mulvaney said. “I’m perfectly happy being in the Senate.”

But within a year, Mulvaney was not only challenging Spratt, he defeated him handily in 2010 on a message of reforming Washington and slashing federal spending. “There’s a few things I just think we all believe,” he said in one campaign ad. “We cannot continue to spend money we don’t have.”

Candidate’s ex-senator dad lobbies for Chinese tech firm. That could be a problem
Former Sen. Joe Lieberman advising son Matt, and China’s ZTE

Matt Lieberman, son of former Sen. Joe Lieberman, is running for Senate in Georgia.  (Screenshot/Lieberman for Senate/YouTube)

U.S. national security experts of all political stripes agree: Chinese tech behemoth ZTE is a threat.

The company is a leading candidate to provide new markets with 5G networks, a lightning-fast wireless service that will support advanced technological applications.

Private equity is a driving force for economic opportunity
New report highlights industry’s growing role in boosting over 25 million U.S. jobs

A new report by Ernst & Young, in partnership with the American Investment Council, offers a previously unreported look at private equity’s growing role in directly supporting nearly 9 million U.S. jobs and its positive contributions to over 17 million more. (Screenshot/American Investment Council/YouTube)

OPINION — Ambitious new programs are central to every presidential campaign, on the right or the left. Whether it’s a border wall or universal health care, voters want to hear what candidates will do and how they intend to pay for it. Of course, the latter part of that question often comes with an unspoken addendum: How will you pay for it — without taxing me?

For some, the answer has been to attack an industry that benefits public-sector pensions, universities and foundations without having to address the consequences of their policy proposals. But what might make for a good stump speech on the campaign trail can ultimately have a very real impact for millions of middle-class American families that stand to benefit most from a vibrant economy. Fortunately, there’s still plenty of time for leading candidates to study the capital flows driving new opportunities for American workers — and none stand out more than private equity.

Campus Notebook: Idahoans in Africa highlight congressional travel
The latest travelogue and interesting disclosures

Idaho Sens. Mike Crapo, left, and James Risch  traveled to a well-known national park in Mozambique. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

This week’s Campus Notebook highlights senators who recently jetted off to Mozambique, Israel and France and a staffer who sold a bunch of stocks, including from the tech industry. 

Idahoans in Africa: Sen. Mike Crapo and his wife Susan joined Sen. Jim Risch and his wife Vicki for a trip to Johannesburg, South Africa and Mozambique. Crapo and his wife’s trip, paid for by the International Conservation Caucus Foundation, cost $14,113. Risch and his wife’s trip, paid for by the same group, cost $13,758.

Elijah Cummings to lie in state in Statuary Hall ahead of Friday funeral
Memorial services set for Thursday in Washington and Friday in Baltimore

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. listens to testimony before Select Committee on Intelligence hearing involving allegations of CIA involvement in the crack cocaine epidemic on Oct. 23, 1996. (Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings will lie in state in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall Thursday before a Friday funeral in his home district of Baltimore. 

Many lawmakers are expected to attend the memorial service for the House Oversight and Reform Committee chairman, which will be held Thursday morning. The ceremony will be held Thursday morning and will be open to members of Congress, the Cummings family and invited guests. 

Some Republicans inch closer to Trump impeachment after Mulvaney comments
Possible support for the ongoing probe comes as 2016 presidential candidate Kasich supports impeachment outright

Florida Rep. Francis Rooney, who is weighing retiring from Congress, has broken with his Republican colleagues on impeachment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Several Republicans grew more receptive this week to the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump after acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney on Thursday said in a televised briefing that seeking help to investigate Democrats was part of the reason military aid to Ukraine was temporarily withheld.

While Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill have signaled they’re eager to learn more from the impeachment investigation led by House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff, 2016 GOP presidential candidate and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich said Friday that he is “across the Rubicon” and Trump should be impeached.

Whose rules? Your rules!
Vigorous impeachment inquiry debate on House floor

Reps. Steve Scalise, left, and Steny H. Hoyer debate impeachment inquiry on the House floor. (Screenshots/House Recording Studio)

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, a Maryland Democrat, and Minority Whip Steve Scalise spent more than an hour on the House floor Friday afternoon engaged in a spirited debate over the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. The two lawmakers meet on the floor weekly to discuss their caucuses’ legislative agenda. Friday’s exchange was a stark departure from the more congenial tone in their fly-out day conversations.

Commerce watchdog will monitor efforts to keep 2020 census secure
GAO and lawmakers have raised security concerns over Census Bureau’s IT systems

The Commerce Department inspector general will be monitoring the Census Bureau’s efforts to keep the 2020 census secure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Commerce Department’s internal watchdog will take a look at the Census Bureau’s efforts to keep the 2020 census secure, the inspector general said in a letter Thursday.

The announcement follows a trail of security concerns about Census Bureau systems for next year’s count from the Government Accountability Office and members of Congress. Next year’s census will allow an online response option for most of the country for the first time, along with traditional mail and phone response.

Forget impeachment, let’s talk about the Nats: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of October 14, 2019

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., departs from a press conference after the Senate Republicans’ lunch in the Capitol on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

While no one is on the same page about the impeachment inquiry or the Trump administration’s foreign policy moves, all of D.C. can at least agree on one thing: the Nationals making it to the World Series is “pretty exciting,” as ever-enthusiastic Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell put it.

Between putt-putt mishaps, rebukes of Chairman LeBron James and an auction for the Stanley Cup, Congress has been on the ball lately.

Polling impeachment and remembering Elijah Cummings
CQ on Congress, Ep. 172

A memorial for the late House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., is seen in the committee’s Rayburn Building hearing room on. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Polls now show a majority of Americans favor impeaching President Donald Trump and removing him from office. Democratic pollster Brad Bannon explains how people should read the rush of new surveys coming in. We also remember Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Maryland Democrat who passed away this week, by reprising his 2017 interview with CQ Roll Call.