california

Rep. Duncan Hunter’s trial pushed to 2020
California Republican accused of misusing more than $250,000 in campaign funds will go to court just weeks before primary

The trial of California Rep. Duncan Hunter is now scheduled to begin Jan. 14, 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Duncan Hunter’s trial on charges that he improperly spent hundreds of thousands in campaign funds on lavish vacations, golf outings and copious amounts of alcohol has been moved to Jan. 14.

The California Republican’s trial was originally scheduled to start Sept. 10.

Duncan Hunter’s trial appears on track to be postponed
California Republican faces avalanche of charges relating to alleged misuse of campaign cash

Rep. Duncan Hunter is seeking a delay in the start of his trial on campaign corruption charges. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawyers involved in Rep. Duncan Hunter’s trial on charges that he inappropriately spent $250,000 in campaign funds for massive bar tabs and elaborate vacations to Hawaii and Italy are asking a California judge to have the proceedings delayed until Oct. 29.

A joint status report filed Monday in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California seeks to move the trial, currently scheduled to begin Sept.10, to October. But the date proposed by lawyers for both the California Republican and the government could change based on court schedules and the status of appeals. More will be known after a district court hearing scheduled for Tuesday.

Duncan Hunter said person making ‘OK’ sign in photo was a ‘stranger.’ The man calls Hunter a friend
California Republican backtracks, but episode could foreshadow his 2020 strategy

California Rep. Duncan Hunter was photographed at a July Fourth parade with a man who has ties to white supremacists. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When a constituent who posed for a photo with Rep. Duncan Hunter was later found to have white supremacist ties, a Hunter staffer dismissed him as “a stranger in a parade who wanted to be in a picture” with the Republican congressman.

The photo showed Hunter at a July Fourth parade in his Southern California district, standing beside Kris Wyrick, who flashes an “OK” gesture — a sign appropriated by extremists in recent years to mean “WP” or “white power.”

Biden vows to be less polite with Harris in Detroit debate. That won’t be enough
Ex-veep has to convince a changing party he’s the one to take them forward

Former Vice President Joe Biden needs to show the same fire and finesse onstage this week that California Sen. Kamala Harris did when she attacked him in their debate last month, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photos)

OPINION — Before Kamala Harris and Joe Biden were bitter rivals, they were friends. That much was obvious in 2017 on the day Biden, then the outgoing vice president, swore in Harris as just the second African American woman ever elected to the Senate.

“Promise me, when I’m no longer vice president, you won’t say, ‘Joe who?’” he joked to a dozen of Harris’s closest friends and family who had come to see her get sworn in. With everyone in happy laughter, Harris gave Biden a pat on the back, the way you might a kindly grandfather. “Why don’t we have a standing get-together for coffee?” she said. “You can tell me some stories and give me some advice.”

When Kamala Harris lost on election night, but won three weeks later
Her nail-biting 2010 victory for California attorney general raised her national profile

Kamala Harris, here campaigning in Los Angeles in September 2010, came under fire in her race for state attorney for her record as San Francisco district attorney. (Jason Redmond/AP file photo)

This is the fourth installment in “Battle Tested,” a series analyzing early campaigns of some Democrats seeking the 2020 presidential nomination. Earlier pieces focused on Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Sen. Cory Booker and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

In November 2008, Kamala Harris was sprinting through Burbank airport with her campaign adviser, Ace Smith.

Levin bill would put electric car chargers at national parks and forests
Transportation sector accounts for nearly a third of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions

Rep. Mike Levin, D-Calif., introduced a bill this week to make national parks and forests more electric car-friendly. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bill filed Wednesday by Rep. Mike Levin would provide millions of dollars for the federal agencies governing U.S. national parks and forests to facilitate the installation of electric car charging stations to promote the use of zero-emissions vehicles on public lands.

Under the bill, which Levin has dubbed the “Green Spaces, Green Vehicles Act,” The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service would also be required to obtain zero-emissions vehicles and shuttle buses to replace the gas-fueled fleets they use now.

Rep. Katie Porter’s $1 million second quarter paces vulnerable Democrats so far
More than 17,000 unique donors have contributed to the California Democrat’s campaign since January

Rep. Katie Porter, D-Calif., questions Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in February. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Katie Porter raised more than $1 million in the second fundraising quarter of 2019, the most reported so far of nearly three dozen House Democrats in districts leadership has deemed vulnerable.

The California freshman Democrat’s grassroots efforts in the 45th District have paid off, with twice as many small donors — those who gave $100 or less — giving money to her campaign in the second quarter than in the first quarter, according to a news release Wednesday from her campaign.

Road ahead: War powers debate shifts to House
Senate turns back to nominations after brief period of legislating

California Rep. Ro Khanna is leading an amendment to the House version of the National Defense Authorization Act that would block the Trump administration from using military force in Iran without congressional approval. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:02 p.m. | Congress could get a second opportunity this week to try and block President Donald Trump from going to war with Iran without congressional approval as the House debates its fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act.

The Senate rejected an amendment seeking to add such language to its version of the measure before it left for the July Fourth recess. The overall measure passed 86-8.

Rep. Duncan Hunter deletes photo alongside man making ‘OK’ gesture
Congressman criticized for image of man making sign that has been appropriated to mean ‘white power’

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., deleted a photo of himself at a Fourth of July parade beside a man making an “OK” gesture. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Duncan Hunter deleted a photo of himself at a Fourth of July parade in his district standing beside a man making an “OK” gesture with his fingers — a symbol that in recent years has been appropriated by the far-right to mean “WP,” or “white power” — following questions from a reporter.

Hunter posted a photo posing with the man and other red-white-and-blue-clad parade-goers to his official congressional Twitter and Facebook pages last week. Following scrutiny of the photo by local media, progressive activists and a political opponent, Hunter’s campaign team first defended the “OK” hand symbol as innocuous. But the California Republican removed the photo from his social media pages Monday following questions from Roll Call about a 2017 video of the man reported to have made the gesture in the photo.

Rep. Duncan Hunter’s ‘deep state’ defense falls apart
Judge unconvinced by defense’s argument that negative headlines will poison San Diego jury

A U.S. District judge ruled Monday ruled against a motion by lawyers representing Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., to dismiss his campaign finance violations case. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Duncan Hunter’s bid to dismiss the corruption charges against him by alleging a “deep state” conspiracy by U.S. attorneys fell apart Monday when it was revealed that Hunter’s lead attorney had attended the same Democratic fundraiser he said biased prosecutors. 

U.S. District Judge Thomas Whelan ruled against a motion filed by Hunter’s team, arguing the case should be relocated or dismissed because two of the prosecutors attended a 2015 fundraiser for Hillary Clinton who was running for president, Bloomberg reported. Their attendance, Hunter’s attorneys said, meant they would be biased in the case against Hunter — an early supporter of Trump.